Critical Thinking Expelled from an Art School. The case of the Art Academy of Latvia

Comic 1

What would one expect after graduating from an art school? Leaving aside more complex questions about what an art school nowadays should and could be, let’s assume that an essential part of art education is the process itself and that the school should not be accountable for everyone not creating a masterpiece at the end. At the same time one would be right to ask the school to have given him/her some necessary tools for the various ways of thinking about one’s practice, to be able to assess its relation to that of others and how could one move it forward. In short – one would expect to be trained in the use of critical thinking both in the creation of artworks and in their contextualisation within the broader frame of culture. These were also the things I mentioned as my aspirations in my study proposal when applying for an MA degree in another school, another country, because these three things I most certainly did not get while studying at the Art Academy of Latvia. I love my Academy and I am grateful for all the support from my tutor there, but further on I will argue that the lack of critical thinking in the Art Academy’s teaching process encourages the production of art practices that do not employ critical thinking in creation and presentation. And that, yes, that is a bad thing. The need to include a note of respect toward the Academy is another example of the intolerance against criticism, as it is not seen as a proper tool to be used in the search for improvement within the Latvian art circles but rather as a marker of dissatisfaction and even personal failure of the critic. Though I have to use examples from my own practice to shed light on the problematic points within the teaching system, I am arguing that these issues affect us all. My main focus is on the Painting Department which could be seen as one of the least developed of all the departments but it does share its characteristics with other disciplines as well.

The staff’s own personal preferences is pretty much what constitutes the bigger portion of how evaluation at the Academy takes place.

For my degree show to acquire a BA at the Art Academy of Latvia in Fine Arts with a specialisation in Painting, I had exhibited two short videos, two paintings, one of which had additional objects accompanying it, two object installations and, finally, one interactive installation. After my (necessarily) short backstory for the creation of the works, the tutor who was responsible for supervising my progress during the creation of the final degree works, did not say a single word about the topics I explored in my works or even the works themselves, leaving all seven of them undiscussed. Instead he focused on explaining to the rest of the jury panel that I was one of the few who had still been interested in painting the models for the study assignments, which of course was a good thing. Not that it came as a surprise to me. I had already grown accustomed to the uninterested, even dismissive, attitude toward the realization of such an art practice that aims to deal with topics that require engagement and critical thinking. How much of that engagement was done when evaluating the works I will not know. The evaluations happen behind closed doors – literally, and no, we do not acquire a detailed report sheet afterwards, in case anybody’s asking. The same applies to the assessments at the end of every semester. It comes as even a bigger surprise when one knows that a couple of years ago the short discussions about the grade for the mid-term works happened in front of the student, but the road toward improvement somehow went in the direction of the jury staff going into their little cabinet, and only afterwards the students would get to know their grade. Thankfully the close-knit art community of Latvia is mirrored in the informal atmosphere at the Academy and there are no restrictions regarding independent discussions with your tutor in order try to find out their opinions at another time. That does not mean that one will get an in-depth analysis of their work, though. One of my current tutors mentioned a member of staff at Falmouth being fired after his use of an expression such as ‘’It does not have enough fizz’’ which apparently was the last straw added to whatever issues the school had with him already. The expression was used in evaluating a student’s work, meaning that no critical reflection was applied and the staff’s own personal preferences were held as a standard for evaluation. Well, the staff’s own personal preferences is pretty much what constitutes the bigger portion of how evaluation at the Academy takes place. With this I do not want to suggest favouritism on the staff’s behalf, but rather use it as a way to introduce the fact that students are not expected to create works that would actually require anything other than simple like/dislike reaction, works that could be critically engaging.

We are coached to add value to our works instead of creating value, a value that could stem from the idea of the work not just as an afterthought, a tick in a box. Therefore socially engaged works will be seen as created just for the effect of provoking a reaction, disregarding the particular issue that they were created to deal with.

The Academy can be famed for its strong emphasis on academical skills in drawing, painting and sculpting. However, the compositional assignments do not request students to use the medium to create something beyond its basic aesthetic value – something that could have a meaning other than the employment of the skill behind it. Experimentation with materials basically ends with a lesson in the use of household paints and, as an additional treat, the use of such an inventive under-frame shape as a circle – as if the relatively new shape was a satisfactory reason in itself for bringing a new object into the world. Students are not asked to research, think and discuss what the borders of the frame itself mean in the world perceived by sight and how the medium can encapsulate the rich history behind its use. Instead we are shown examples of artists from elsewhere who use these reconfigurations of materials – simply because the artists are relevant somewhere. By exercising the skill of addition to our works we too can aim to approach a global significance. We are coached to add value to our works instead of creating value, a value that could stem from the idea of the work not just as an afterthought, a tick in a box. Therefore socially engaged works will be seen as created just for the effect of provoking a reaction, disregarding the particular issue that they were created to deal with. As an example I present the phrase that was used by the staff to describe me taking up volunteer work at the only Latvian LGBT organisation – that these were ‘’lesbian courses’’, and I also received a supposedly supportive comment from someone ‘’also having experimented while in college’’. The topics of feminism and queer theory were just bundled up in a neat pile of ‘’women’s issues’’.

The bar of expectations is lowered to accommodate the students, not to enhance their practice.

Should one think that these questions could be raised in the theoretical classes – they could, but they are not. There is a minimum of extra credits that a student must get to acquire the diploma and unfortunately they are not encouraged to get these by taking up additional theoretical classes from other departments that could broaden their perception of what is practice and how to contextualise it. What is more unfortunate, when joining the courses intended for students in the Art History Department, one is left with the same incompetency of critical thought and engagement characteristic of the practice based courses. In my second year of studies, I should not have been the best student among the fourth year Art History students in a class of their own curriculum. And again, by handing in a paper for Art History, written in just three hours before the deadline, it should not have been praised as being as good and even better than some of the research done by Art History students in their final year. The bar of expectations is lowered to accommodate the students, not to enhance their practice.

Consequently, a want for theoretical backup for the work is seen as a failure of the work itself and its lack of visual strength.

Intensive discussions, both written and verbal, are a must to develop the capacity to explain and present your work. However, the students are shunned for talking too much – too much being more than a couple of minutes or even a minute – when discussing their work, as not only the work should speak for itself but, as mentioned before, the basic assumption is that the artist should not base the creation of the work on anything other than its visual representational effect. Consequently, a want for theoretical backup for the work is seen as a failure of the work itself and its lack of visual strength.

All of this might mean nothing to a strong individual who will not stop at the barriers placed in front of them and will carry on with independent research anyway. I applied to another art school and I am not the only one to have done so. A more pressing question for the Latvian art scene would be whether these people will return. And, even more importantly, what will happen then. For the sake of argument let’s assume that these people have acquired a better education elsewhere and have improved and so on. But it is not enough, even if correct, to simply bring something back into the same environment that lacks not only the tools for creating critical work but also the tools of critically receiving these works. Otherwise we get one of the two art portals dedicated to Baltic art headlining its article simply by stating that the Latvian artist Ivars Grāvlejs has brought an exhibition of famous Czech photographers to Latvia.1 Should the readers take the value of the exhibition for granted because the photographers are famous or because they are Czech – i.e. from abroad? Is that how we are taught to critically assess information and the artworks themselves? The contributors to the art news portal are not people who are not connected to the Latvian art world. They are among its constant creators. They should know better how to present information and how to present value. Nevermind whether the artists are good or not, the case of questioning it should not be set aside by simply marking them as famous. The consequences of this dismissal of critical thought extends to the professional art world, which is yet another topic, but these issues are irreversibly tied together and they bear responsibilities toward each other which should be kept in mind by all of the practicing artists out there.

  1. The sub-header of the article states: ‘’Ivars Grāvlejs brings an exhibition of famous Czech photographers to Latvia.’’ http://www.arterritory.com/lv/zinas/archive/3/ A different title appears after clicking on the article; the sub-hearder served only as a surrogate headline. http://www.arterritory.com/lv/zinas/4934-vai_tas_ir_smalks_humors,_vai_vini_tiesam_ir_divaini/ Accessed on 22.11.2015.  

Kritiskā domāšana izmesta no mākslas skolas. Latvijas Mākslas akadēmijas gadījums

irracionala nave

Ko studenti sagaida no mākslas universitātēm? Šoreiz neaplūkojot, kāda varētu būt un kādai vajadzētu būt mākslas izglītībai mūsdienās, pieņemsim, ka, pirmkārt, pats mācību process ir viena no svarīgākajām izglītības sastāvdaļām, un, otrkārt, ka izglītības iestāde nav vainīga pie tā, ka ikkatrs tās absolvents nerada ģeniālus mākslas darbus. Tajā pašā laikā studentam ir tiesības sagaidīt no savas universitātes ieskatu, kā kontekstualizēt savu mākslas praksi, kā izprast tās attiecības ar citiem mākslas darbiem un kā attīstīt savu tālāko virzību. Īsāk sakot, universitātei vajadzētu attīstīt studenta kritisko domāšanu gan mākslas darbu radīšanas procesā, gan meklējot un veidojot to kontekstu plašākā kultūras pasaulē. Šīs trīs lietas es arī minēju kā mērķus, rakstot pieteikumu maģistra studijām – ne Latvijas Mākslas akadēmijā (LMA), bet gan citā skolā un citā valstī, jo tieši šīs trīs lietas es neieguvu studiju laikā LMA. Akadēmija man ir ļoti mīļa, un esmu ārkārtīgi pateicīga savam diplomdarba vadītājam par viņa ieguldīto laiku, taču šis raksts ir tapis ar mērķi norādīt uz kritiskās domāšanas iztrūkumu Latvijas Mākslas akadēmijas mācību procesā, kas rada negatīvu ietekmi uz studentu mākslas darbu potenciālu. Arī nepieciešamība pieminēt cieņu pret LMA apliecina nespēju pieņemt kritiku, jo tā Latvijas mākslas aprindās netiek uzskatīta par līdzekli ceļā uz attīstību, bet drīzāk tiek vērtēta kā kritikas paudēja neapmierinātība vai pat neveiksme personīgajā darbā. Lai norādītu uz konkrētām problēmām, izmantošu piemērus no savas pieredzes, koncentrējoties uz Glezniecības katedru. Tā varētu tikt uzskatīta par vismazāk attīstīto nodaļu tieši kritiskās domāšanas pielietošanas ziņā, bet es esmu pārliecināta, ka minētās problēmas skar visas nodaļas.

Akadēmijā studentu mākslas darbu vērtēšanas procesa lielāko daļu veido tieši pasniedzēju personīgās preferences.

Lai LMA iegūtu Bakalaura grādu Vizuālajā mākslā ar specializāciju glezniecībā, diplomdarba aizstāvēšanā es prezentēju trīs nelielus video darbus, divas gleznas – vienu no tām ar papildu objektiem –, divas instalācijas un vienu interaktīvu instalāciju. Pēc mana (obligāti) īsā ievada par darba tēmu, bija jārunā diplomdarba vadītājam. Pārējiem komisijas locekļiem viņš izvēlējās stāstīt par to, ka es biju viena no retajām studentēm, kuru vēl joprojām interesēja gleznot uzstādījuma modeļus – tā tika uzsvērta kā pozitīva īpašība. Viņš nepieminēja ne manu darbu tēmu, ne arī nevienu no astoņiem eksponētajiem darbiem. Man tas diemžēl nebija liels pārsteigums, jo jau biju pieradusi pie neieinteresētās, pat noraidošās attieksmes pret tādiem mākslas darbiem, kas pieprasa analītisku domāšanu un iedziļināšanos. To, cik lielā mērā šī iedziļināšanās notiek, vērtējot darbus, es nekad neuzzināšu. Vērtēšana notiek burtiski aiz slēgtām durvīm, bet studenti pēc rezultātu paziņošanas neiegūst detalizētu vērtējuma pamatojumu. Tas pats norisinās arī katra semestra skatēs. Lai arī pirms pāris gadiem dažu sekunžu īsās apspriedes vismaz notika studenta klātbūtnē pie viņa darbiem, tālākā attīstības gaita noveda pie komisijas nolīšanas katedras kabinetā. Par laimi, Latvijas mākslas vides šaurais loks nozīmē arī neformālu gaisotni LMA vidē, kas neliedz aprunāties ar pasniedzēju individuāli citā laikā. Tas gan nenozīmē, ka būs iespējams iegūt padziļinātu darba analīzi. Viena no manām šībrīža pasniedzējām pastāstīja par atgadījumu ar kādu Falmutas mākslas universitātes pasniedzēju, kurš studenta darba vērtējumā bija izmantojis frāzi “tam trūkstot ”dzirksts””. Šīs frāzes izmantošana norādīja, ka pasniedzējs vērtēja darbu, balstoties uz savām subjektīvajām sajūtām, un drīz pēc tam viņš tika atlaists. Diemžēl Latvijas Mākslas akadēmijā studentu mākslas darbu vērtēšanas procesa lielāko daļu veido tieši pasniedzēju personīgās preferences. Ar šo apgalvojumu es vēlos nevis norādīt uz negodīgu favorītismu no pasniedzēju puses, bet gan uzsākt diskusiju par to, ka no studentiem nemaz netiek sagaidīta tādu darbu radīšana, kas prasītu vairāk par patīk/nepatīk reakciju, tādu darbu radīšana, kas pieprasītu aktīvu vērotāja iesaistīšanos.

Mēs tiekam mācīti pievienot, nevis radīt vērtību – tādu vērtību, kas radusies no darba idejas, nevis piekabināta tai ķeksīša dēļ. Tādēļ arī tiek uzskatīts, ka darbi, kuru pamatā ir sociālas vai politiskas tēmas, radīti tikai ar mērķi izraisīt reakciju, savukārt konkrēti tematizētās problēmas tiek nobīdītas malā.

Latvijas Mākslas akadēmija tiek slavēta par tās spēcīgajām akadēmiskajām tradīcijām zīmēšanā, glezniecībā un tēlniecībā. Tikmēr kompozīcijas uzdevumi neprasa studentiem izmanot konkrētu mediju, lai radītu ko nozīmīgāku par tehniskās prasmes apliecinošiem darbiem. Eksperimentēšana ar materiāliem (konkrēti Glezniecības nodaļā) principā sākas un beidzas ar mācību par sadzīves krāsām un nopludinājuma efektiem, bet kā papildu bonuss kalpo iepazīstināšana ar tādu īpašu lietu kā apļa apakšrāmis – it kā salīdzinoši jaunā forma būtu iemesls jauna darba radīšanai. Studenti netiek aicināti domāt, pētīt un diskutēt par rāmja nozīmi galvenokārt vizuāli uztveramā pasaulē vai to, kā konkrētais materiāls var ietvert sevī visu tā izmantojuma kultūrvēsturi. Tā vietā mums tiek rādīti ārvalstu mākslinieku darbi, kuros izmantotas dažādu materiālu rekonfigurācijas, bet tas tiek darīts nevis tādēļ, lai iedvesmotu studentus ļauties plašajām materiālu izmantošanas iespējām, bet tikai tādēļ, ka šie mākslinieki ir starptautiski veiksmīgi. Arī mēs varam pietuvoties viņu atpazīstamībai, ja īstenosim ”pievienošanas mākslu”. Mēs tiekam mācīti pievienot, nevis radīt vērtību – tādu vērtību, kas radusies no darba idejas, nevis piekabināta tai ķeksīša dēļ. Tādēļ arī tiek uzskatīts, ka darbi, kuru pamatā ir sociālas vai politiskas tēmas, radīti tikai ar mērķi izraisīt reakciju, savukārt konkrēti tematizētās problēmas tiek nobīdītas malā. Politiski vai sociāli aktīva māksla netiek uztverta nopietni, jo tās apskatītās tēmas ne vienmēr atbilst pasniedzēju interesēm. Kā piemēru varu minēt gadījumu ar vienu no LMA pasniedzējiem, kas manu iesaisti vienīgajā Latvijas LGBT organizācijā nosauca par “lesbiešu kursiem”, bet cits personāla loceklis komentēja, ka arī viņš esot “eksperimentējis studiju laikā”. Feminisma un kvīru teorijas toties tiek samesta vienā “sieviešu problēmu” kaudzītē.

No studentiem prasītais līmenis tiek pazemināts, lai balstītu un tātad turpinātu viņu nespēju izkopt kritisku analīzi, nevis uzturēts kaut cik augstā līmenī, lai veicinātu studentu attīstības iespējas.

Varētu cerēt, ka diskusijas par šiem jautājumiem notiek teorētiskajās lekcijās, bet tā diemžēl nenotiek. Lai saņemtu diplomu, studentam jāiegūst papildu kredītpunkti no brīvās izvēles kursiem. Studenti netiek aicināti tos iegūt, apmeklējot Vizuālās mākslas un kultūras vēstures katedras teorētiskās lekcijas, kas palīdzētu izkopt studentu kritiskās domāšanas spējas, kas ir jo īpaši svarīgi (lielākoties) tikko vidusskolu absolvējušiem studentiem. Diemžēl pat apmeklējot šīs teorētiskās lekcijas, studentu diskusijās nākas saskarties ar to pašu kritiskās analīzes iztrūkumu, kas raksturīgs praktiskajām disciplīnām.[1] Savā otrajā studiju gadā es sev vienlaikus par prieku un nelaimi biju labākā studente ceturtā gada Mākslas zinātnes studentu vidū. Kad trešajā mācību gadā iesniedzu tikai trīs stundu laikā uzrakstītu referātu, tas tika slavēts kā tikpat labs un pat vēl labāks par dažiem pēdējā mācību gada Mākslas zinātnes studentu darbiem. No studentiem prasītais līmenis tiek pazemināts, lai balstītu un tātad turpinātu viņu nespēju izkopt kritisku analīzi, nevis uzturēts kaut cik augstā līmenī, lai veicinātu studentu attīstības iespējas.

Vajadzība pēc teorētiska pamatojuma tiek saistīta ar darba vājumu un vizuālā iedarbīguma trūkumu.

Spējas paust savu viedokli ne vien rakstiski, bet arī aktīvās diskusijās ir būtisks priekšnoteikums, lai students būtu gatavs prezentēt savu veikumu arī ārpus mācību iestādes. Pretēji vēlamajam, studenti LMA ne vien netiek apmācīti šajās prasmēs, bet pat tiek kaunināti par pārlieku garu runāšanu, skaidrojot savus darbus – jāprecizē, ka pārlieku gara runa ir tad, ja ilgst vairāk par pāris minūtēm. Darbiem būtu jārunā pašiem par sevi, bet vajadzība pēc teorētiska pamatojuma tiek saistīta ar darba vājumu un vizuālā iedarbīguma trūkumu, kam būtu jābūt vienīgajam un svarīgākajam darba radīšanas iemeslam.

Aplūkotie izglītības trūkumi var arī nebūt šķērslis spēcīgam studentam, kas uzsāks un veiks patstāvīgu izpēti. Tas var arī novest pie tālākas izglītības meklēšanas citur, tāpat kā to izdarīju es un kā to dara arī citi. Nākamais jautājums, kas jāuzdod – kas notiks ar tiem, kas atgriezīsies? Problēma netiek atrisināta, ieviešot kaut ko jaunu tajā pašā vidē, kurai trūkst spējas radīt un kritiski izvērtēt analītiskus darbus. Šībrīža situācijas ilustrēšanai var izmantot vienā no diviem Baltijas mākslai veltītajā interneta portāla publicētā raksta nosaukumu “Ivars Grāvlejs uz Latviju atved slavenu čehu fotogrāfu izstādi”.[2] Vai lasītājiem jāpieņem, ka izstādes kvalitāti garantē tas, ka fotogrāfi ir slaveni, vai arī tas, ka viņi ir čehi, tātad no ārzemēm? Vai tā mēs tiekam mācīti kritiski uztvert informāciju un mākslas darbus? Šī mākslas portāla veidotāji nav atsvešināti no Latvijas mākslas pasaules. Viņi ir vieni no tās konstantajiem veidotājiem. Viņiem būtu jāzina, kā jāpasniedz informācija un kā jāpasniedz kvalitāte. Neatkarīgi no tā, cik labi vai slikti ir mākslinieki, viņu darbu izvērtējums nav jāaizvieto ar slavas uzsvēršanu. Kritiskās domāšanas noraidījuma sekas turpina izpausties arī profesionālajā mākslas pasaulē, kas ir vēl jo plašāka tēma, bet visiem Latvijas mākslas pasaules dalībniekiem jāpatur prātā savstarpējā atbildība, ko ietver viņu attieksme pret darbu radīšanu un to uztveršanu

[1] Kā izņēmumu var minēt Aigas Dzalbes organizētās mākslinieku prezentāciju lekcijas, kurās bija iespējams padziļināti uzzināt par mākslinieku darbību un uzdot jautājumus. Diemžēl zemās studentu aktivitātes dēļ šīs lecijas vairs netiek turpinātas. Savu pārliecību, ka studentu neaktivitāte arī lielā mērā vainojama izglītības problēmās, šajā rakstā es neapskatu apzināti, lai neveidotos pārlieku liels sajukums.

[2] Virsraksts, kas redzams arhīva skatā, ir ”Ivars Grāvlejs uz Latviju atved slavenu čehu fotogrāfu izstādi”. http://www.arterritory.com/lv/zinas/archive/3/ Apmeklējot paša raksta saiti, virsraksts ir cits, bet iepriekš minētais kalpo kā papildu virsraksts. http://www.arterritory.com/lv/zinas/4934-vai_tas_ir_smalks_humors,_vai_vini_tiesam_ir_divaini/ Apskatīts 27.11.2015.

Mētra Saberova
Author
November 23, 2015
Published in Tribune
0 Comments
Social share
Share Button
Print friendly version Print friendly version